Revisiting 2019: Our 50 Most Popular Posts of the Year

 

Dear As It Ought To Be Magazine Readers,

As we enter the next decade, I want to thank all of the writers and readers who have made our tenth year so successful. I take enormous pride in working with so many talented and inspiring writers. Without your brilliance and generosity of spirit and intellect, none of this would be possible. It has been a great privilege to publish your work on our site, and I hope to continue featuring diverse perspectives, challenging ideas, and unique voices for years to come. As a way to look back on what we accomplished in 2019, I have complied the 50 most popular posts of the year based on internet traffic and clicks.

Thank you again to everyone who wrote for, read, and promoted AIOTB Magazine in 2019. Let the 20s roar again!

Chase Dimock
Managing Editor

 

Poetry

Jason Baldinger:

Ishrat Bashir:

Jai Hamid Bashir:

Luis Cuauhtémoc Berriozábal:

Jeffrey Betcher:

Ace Boggess:

Daniel Crocker:

John Dorsey:

Ryan Quinn Flanagan:

Tony Gloeggler:

Nathan Graziano:

Cord Moreski:

Jeanette Powers:

Stephen Roger Powers:

Jonathan K. Rice:

Kevin Ridgeway:

Damian Rucci:

Anna Saunders:

Larry Smith:

Nick Soluri:

William Taylor Jr.:

Alice Teeter:

Tiffany Troy:

Bunkong Tuon:

Agnes Vojta:

Kory Wells:

Brian Chander Wiora:

Dameion Wagner:

 

Nonfiction

Daniel Crocker:

Nathan Graziano:

John Guzlowski:

Cody Sexton:

Carrie Thompson:

 

Reviews 

Chase Dimock:

Mike James:

 

Photo Credit: Fire Works At New Year’s Eve via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

“Jhelum Is Disappearing” By Ishrat Bashir

 

Jhelum Is Disappearing

Jhelum is disappearing
Like the maer* that ran
Through the heart of Srinagar,
My mother used to play
By its embankments.
The touch of water has a memory,
Memory of a dream in which the
World comes to an end.
Jhelum is disappearing.
Now that, you and me, have lost our language,
Our happy roads to each other
Let us promise to share our dreams
In all their incongruity and dissonance,
Each piece of darkness
And each shadow that the moon casts
As we turn our back on it;
Even the one in which you see yourself
Fettered to yourself
At the tips of your toes;
And the one in which we’d wash
Our hands together with soap
Watching the sullied water
Dripping from tips of our soiled fingers
Accompanied by useless words
Gurgling with our laughter
That made others laugh at us.
And the ones in which we wandered
through wild pine woods
With our pieces of jigsaw, lost to each other.
Jhelum is disappearing
And the jigsaw lies incomplete
On the table in the house
That we had planned to built.
That house still holds us together
In the life that has lost us
To the posh colonies of Hyderpora
And narrow stinking alleys of downtown.
One day when both of us are free
And long for rest, we may return,
To that table with our pieces.
But on that day, when it happens,
You must bring that ring of smile
And I shall bring my old mirror.
Poems like waves are reckless
You cannot pitch up your tent
On their shores.
But we must not die, we must
Keep the connection even if
Only at the tips of our toes.

*Canal

 

About the Author: Ishrat Bashir is an Assistant Professor, at the Department of English, Central University of Kashmir. She teaches Short Story, Contemporary Literary Theory and British Drama in the department. She has also worked as Assistant Professor in English in the Department of Higher Education and the South Campus of the University of Kashmir. Her area of interest includes Contemporary Literary Theory, Translation Studies, Arabic literature in translation and Kashmiri literature. She writes poetry and short fiction.

 

Image Credit: John Burke, photographer (Irish, about 1843 – 1900); William H. Baker, photographer (British, about 1829 – 1880), The Jhelum at Srinager. Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program.